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Dear Kelsey,

Last week, I had my thirty day review at work. We launched our site a few days after I started, but—despite the premise of our blog—I never quite saw an opening to talk about it. I could have written about my second week, but that was your first week of school (and really much more exciting). And who cares about third week anniversaries? So, despite our promise to write about books AND life in publishing, this happens to be the first time I’ve mentioned it.

Surprise!

It’s funny how some landmarks get so built up and turn out to be nothing. This applies to the review itself as well as my disinclination to talk about my job. As everyone predicted (my supervisor included) the meeting was fine—lovely even—and there was nothing to worry about. I’ve thought quite a bit about what I should highlight: should I talk about my day-to-day?  Describe the office? Outline my praise and critique? Or just talk about all the delicious treats?  But after the meeting, I kept coming back to how much they appreciated something I didn’t really realize I was doing.  

At the review, my supervisor told me how much she valued my ability to make connections between all of our titles, that I’m always recommending alternate books or companion texts to professors. Obviously, this is something I am consciously doing, but it’s also something I can’t really help. As you may have noticed by my complete inability to write about a single book at a time—always talking about comparison titles and other reading experiences—I have a difficult time thinking about books individually. The stories are certainly distinct, and when I’m reading, I rarely make such comparisons unless I’m consciously trying or am really distracted. But when I’m processing the book, it’s impossible to do otherwise.

Until she mentioned it, I never would have thought of this as a skill, or something valuable I could add to the company. I’ve never thought about it at all. So every day I’m sitting in my office trying my best to project efficiency, competency, and charm and they turn around and value something that’s so integrally me.

Wild.

Anyway, I’m sorry about the delay in posts this week. As I mentioned, it took me awhile to overcome the anxiety of The First Blog Post About My Job. Silly girl.

Love,

Maggie

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